RYE G. COOPER Vs. ELIZABETH L. CHAMBERLAIN

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RYE G. COOPER * NO. 2018-CA-0617 VERSUS * COURT OF APPEAL ELIZABETH L. CHAMBERLAIN * FOURTH CIRCUIT * STATE OF LOUISIANA * * ******* CONSOLIDATED WITH: CONSOLIDATED WITH: RYE G. COOPER NO. 2018-CA-0618 VERSUS ELIZABETH L. CHAMBERLAIN CONSOLIDATED WITH: CONSOLIDATED WITH: RYE G. COOPER NO. 2018-CA-0619 VERSUS ELIZABETH L. CHAMBERLAIN CONSOLIDATED WITH: CONSOLIDATED WITH: RYE G. COOPER NO. 2018-CA-0620 VERSUS ELIZABETH L. CHAMBERLAIN BELSOME, J., CONCURS WITH REASONS. I respectfully concur in the majority’s opinion to affirm the trial court’s judgment authorizing the relocation of the parties’ minor child to Nashville, Tennessee with his mother, Ms. Elizabeth Chamberlain. However, while I hesitantly agree with the result reached in this case, I find that some of the relocation factors weighed heavily in favor of the father. 1 As correctly stated by the majority, there are twelve relocation factors to be considered. Eight of the factors were weighed in favor of Ms. Chamberlain; four were found to be either inapplicable or neutral; and none were found to be in favor of Mr. Cooper. Such an analysis belies the evidence in the record. The undisputed evidence reflects the child had a strong paternal family support system in Louisiana, including his father, grandparents, aunts, cousins and extended family.1 In addition, he also had an established network of school friends. Accordingly, at a minimum, the first two relocation factors concerning significant persons in the child’s life and the impact on physical and emotional development weigh in favor of Mr. Cooper. Nevertheless, given the analysis of the other factors, I agree with the majority’s finding that the trial court did not abuse its discretion in authorizing the relocation. For these reasons, I concur in the majority’s opinion to affirm the trial court’s judgment. 1 In support of Mr. Cooper’s testimony, both Mr. Cooper’s mother and step-sister testified regarding Ms. Chamberlain’s indifference to fostering the child’s relationships with his paternal family members. Although their testimony went uncontested, the trial court questioned their credibility. Meanwhile, without supporting testimony from her mother, the trial court accepted Ms. Chamberlain’s self-serving testimony that her mother would move with her to Nashville to assist in childcare without hesitation. 2