2010 Wisconsin Code
Chapter 402. Uniform commercial code--sales.
402.725 Statute of limitations in contracts for sale.

402.725

402.725 Statute of limitations in contracts for sale.

402.725(1)

(1) An action for breach of any contract for sale must be commenced within 6 years after the cause of action has accrued. By the original agreement the parties, if they are merchants, may reduce the period of limitation to not less than one year. The period of limitation may not otherwise be varied by agreement.

402.725(2)

(2) A cause of action accrues when the breach occurs, regardless of the aggrieved party's lack of knowledge of the breach. A breach of warranty occurs when tender of delivery is made, except that where a warranty explicitly extends to future performance of the goods and discovery of the breach must await the time of such performance the cause of action accrues when the breach is or should have been discovered.

402.725(3)

(3) Where an action commenced within the time limited by sub. (1) is so terminated as to leave available a remedy by another action for the same breach such other action may be commenced after the expiration of the time limited and within 6 months after the termination of the first action unless the termination resulted from voluntary discontinuance or from dismissal for failure or neglect to prosecute.

402.725(4)

(4) This section does not alter the law on tolling of the statute of limitations nor does it apply to causes of action which have accrued before chs. 401 to 409 or before ch. 410 or 411 became effective.

402.725 - ANNOT.

History: 1979 c. 89; 1991 a. 148, 304, 315.

402.725 - ANNOT.

The county was a "merchant" under s. 402.104 for purposes of limitation under s. 402.725 (1). County of Milwaukee v. Northrop Data Systems, 602 F.2d 767 (1979).

402.725 - ANNOT.

Wisconsin law was applied despite a contrary choice of law provision in the contract. Office Supply Co. v. Basic/Four Corp. 538 F. Supp. 776 (1982).

402.725 - ANNOT.

A stringent standard applies in determining whether a warranty explicitly extends to future performance. There must be specific reference to a future time in the warranty, satisfied when a warranty guarantees a product for a particular number of years, or for a less precise, but still determinable period. Selzer v. Brunsell Brothers, Ltd. 2002 WI App 232, 257 Wis. 2d 809, 652 N.W.2d 806, 01-2625.

402.725 - ANNOT.

Implied warranties cannot, by their nature, explicitly extend to future performance. The statute of limitations will always start to run against claims based on implied warranty from the time when delivery of the goods is tendered. Selzer v. Brunsell Brothers, Ltd. 2002 WI App 232, 257 Wis. 2d 809, 652 N.W.2d 806, 01-2625.

402.725 - ANNOT.

While all warranties in a general sense apply to the future performance of goods, the future performance exception in sub. (2) applies only when the warranty explicitly extends to future performance. Evidence that the goods break or physically deteriorate after delivery may be relevant to whether the goods were fit at the time of delivery for the ordinary purpose for which they are used; but consideration of that evidence for that purpose does not impose an express warranty for future performance. City of Stoughton v. Thomasson Lumber Company, 2004 WI App 6, 269 Wis. 2d 339, 675 N.W.2d 487, 02-2192.

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