2010 US Code
Title 42 - THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE
CHAPTER 121 - INTERNATIONAL CHILD ABDUCTION REMEDIES
Sec. 11606 - United States Central Authority

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Metadata
Publication TitleUnited States Code, 2006 Edition, Supplement 4, Title 42 - THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE
CategoryBills and Statutes
CollectionUnited States Code
SuDoc Class NumberY 1.2/5:
Contained WithinTitle 42 - THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE
CHAPTER 121 - INTERNATIONAL CHILD ABDUCTION REMEDIES
Sec. 11606 - United States Central Authority
Containssection 11606
Date2010
Laws in Effect as of DateJanuary 7, 2011
Positive LawNo
Dispositionstandard
Source CreditPub. L. 100-300, §7, Apr. 29, 1988, 102 Stat. 439; Pub. L. 105-277, div. G, title XXII, §2213, Oct. 21, 1998, 112 Stat. 2681-812; Pub. L. 108-370, §2, Oct. 25, 2004, 118 Stat. 1750.
Statutes at Large References49 Stat. 620
102 Stat. 439, 437
112 Stat. 2681-812
118 Stat. 1750
Public Law ReferencesPublic Law 100-300, Public Law 105-277, Public Law 108-370


§11606. United States Central Authority (a) Designation

The President shall designate a Federal agency to serve as the Central Authority for the United States under the Convention.

(b) Functions

The functions of the United States Central Authority are those ascribed to the Central Authority by the Convention and this chapter.

(c) Regulatory authority

The United States Central Authority is authorized to issue such regulations as may be necessary to carry out its functions under the Convention and this chapter.

(d) Obtaining information from Parent Locator Service

The United States Central Authority may, to the extent authorized by the Social Security Act [42 U.S.C. 301 et seq.], obtain information from the Parent Locator Service.

(e) Grant authority

The United States Central Authority is authorized to make grants to, or enter into contracts or agreements with, any individual, corporation, other Federal, State, or local agency, or private entity or organization in the United States for purposes of accomplishing its responsibilities under the Convention and this chapter.

(f) Limited liability of private entities acting under the direction of the United States Central Authority (1) Limitation on liability

Except as provided in paragraphs (2) and (3), a private entity or organization that receives a grant from or enters into a contract or agreement with the United States Central Authority under subsection (e) of this section for purposes of assisting the United States Central Authority in carrying out its responsibilities and functions under the Convention and this chapter, including any director, officer, employee, or agent of such entity or organization, shall not be liable in any civil action sounding in tort for damages directly related to the performance of such responsibilities and functions as defined by the regulations issued under subsection (c) of this section that are in effect on October 1, 2004.

(2) Exception for intentional, reckless, or other misconduct

The limitation on liability under paragraph (1) shall not apply in any action in which the plaintiff proves that the private entity, organization, officer, employee, or agent described in paragraph (1), as the case may be, engaged in intentional misconduct or acted, or failed to act, with actual malice, with reckless disregard to a substantial risk of causing injury without legal justification, or for a purpose unrelated to the performance of responsibilities or functions under this chapter.

(3) Exception for ordinary business activities

The limitation on liability under paragraph (1) shall not apply to any alleged act or omission related to an ordinary business activity, such as an activity involving general administration or operations, the use of motor vehicles, or personnel management.

(Pub. L. 100–300, §7, Apr. 29, 1988, 102 Stat. 439; Pub. L. 105–277, div. G, title XXII, §2213, Oct. 21, 1998, 112 Stat. 2681–812; Pub. L. 108–370, §2, Oct. 25, 2004, 118 Stat. 1750.)

References in Text

This chapter, referred to in subsecs. (b), (c), (e), and (f), was in the original “this Act” meaning Pub. L. 100–300, Apr. 29, 1988, 102 Stat. 437, as amended, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 11601 of this title and Tables.

The Social Security Act, referred to in subsec. (d), is act Aug. 14, 1935, ch. 531, 49 Stat. 620, as amended, which is classified generally to chapter 7 (§301 et seq.) of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see section 1305 of this title and Tables.

Amendments

2004—Subsec. (f). Pub. L. 108–370 added subsec. (f).

1998—Subsec. (e). Pub. L. 105–277 added subsec. (e).

Ex. Ord. No. 12648. Implementation of Convention on Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction

Ex. Ord. No. 12648, Aug. 11, 1988, 53 F.R. 30637, provided:

The United States of America deposited its instrument of ratification of the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (“Convention”) on April 29, 1988. The Convention entered into force for the United States on July 1, 1988. Article 6 of the Convention imposes upon Contracting States an obligation to designate a “Central Authority” for the purpose of discharging certain specified functions.

In order that the Government of the United States of America may give full and complete effect to the Convention, and pursuant to section 7 of the International Child Abduction Remedies Act, Public Law No. 100–300 (1988) [42 U.S.C. 11606], it is expedient and necessary that I designate a Central Authority within the Executive branch of said Government:

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including section 301 of Title 3 of the United States Code and section 7 of the International Child Abduction Remedies Act, it is ordered as follows:

Section 1. Designation of Central Authority. The Department of State is hereby designated as the Central Authority of the United States for purposes of the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction. The Secretary of State is hereby authorized and empowered, in accordance with such regulations as he may prescribe, to perform all lawful acts that may be necessary and proper in order to execute the functions of the Central Authority in a timely and efficient manner.

Ronald Reagan.

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