United States v. Annabi, No. 12-4988 (2d Cir. 2014)

Annotate this Case
Justia Opinion Summary

Defendant appealed a forfeiture order in connection with a conviction for, inter alia, three counts of mortgage fraud (Counts Seven, Eight, and Nine). At issue was whether the district court erred by ordering forfeiture on Count Seven under a statute which, while applicable to Count Seven, was onlly charged in the indictment in connection with Counts Eight and Nine - an oversight that was not corrected by the Government or the district court before or during sentencing. The court concluded that forfeiture was limited to that authorized by the statute listed in the indictment, even if greater forfeiture would have been authorized by a different statute, where the government fails to invoke the harsher forfeiture provision prior to or during sentencing; 28 U.S.C. 982(a) authorizes forfeiture of the full amount of the loans fraudulently obtained in Counts Eight and Nine, without an offset for any portion of the loan that has been repaid; and 28 U.S.C. 981(a)(1)(c), the only forfeiture provision charged in Count Seven, permitted an offset for that portion of the loan that was repaid with no loss to the victim. Accordingly, the court affirmed the forfeiture order on Counts Eight and Nine, and remanded with instructions to vacate the forfeiture order on Count Seven.

Download PDF
12 4988 (L)  United States v. Annabi  In the United States Court of Appeals For the Second Circuit ________  AUGUST TERM 2013  Nos. 12 4988 (Lead), 12 4990 (Con)    UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,  Appellee,    v.    SANDY ANNABI AND ZEHY JEREIS,  Defendants Appellants.  ________    Appeal from the United States District Court  for the Southern District of New York.  No. 10 cr 7 (CM)   Colleen McMahon, Judge.   ________    ARGUED: JANUARY 29, 2014    DECIDED: MARCH 25, 2014  ________                2                             No. 12 4988 cv (L) Before: CABRANES, CARNEY and DRONEY, Circuit Judges.  ________  Defendant  Sandy  Annabi  appeals  from  a  November  19,  2012  judgment  of  the  United  States  District  Court  for  the  Southern  District  of  New  York  (Colleen  McMahon,  Judge)  ordering  forfeiture  in  connection  with  a  conviction  for,  inter  alia,  three  counts  of  mortgage fraud (Counts Seven, Eight, and Nine). We consider here  whether  the  District  Court  erred  by  ordering  forfeiture  on  Count  Seven under a statute which, while applicable to Count Seven, was  only charged in the indictment in connection with Counts Eight and  Nine an oversight that was not corrected by the Government or the  District Court before or during sentencing.     We  hold  that  this  was  error  inasmuch  as  the  uncharged  forfeiture statute resulted in harsher forfeiture with respect to Count  Seven than that sought in the indictment. Accordingly, we AFFIRM  the forfeiture order on Counts Eight and Nine only, and REMAND  the  cause  to  the  District  Court  with  instructions  to  VACATE  the  forfeiture order on Count Seven, and conduct such further forfeiture  proceedings as may be appropriate in the circumstances.  ________    EDWARD  V.  SAPONE,  Edward  V.  Sapone,  LLC,  New  York,  NY,  for  Defendant Appellant  Sandy  Annabi.    PAULA  SCHWARTZ  FROME,  Garden  City,  NY,  for  Defendant Appellant Zehy Jereis.    3                             No. 12 4988 cv (L) PERRY  A.  CARBONE,  Assistant  United  States  Attorney  (Preet  Bharara,  United  States  Attorney  for the Southern District of New York, Jason P.W.  Halperin,  Justin  S.  Weddle,  Assistant  United  States  Attorneys,  on  the  brief),  New  York,  NY,  for  Appellee United States of America.  ________  JOSÃ  A. CABRANES, Circuit Judge:  Defendant  Sandy  Annabi  appeals  from  a  November  19,  2012  judgment  of  the  United  States  District  Court  for  the  Southern  District  of  New  York  (Colleen  McMahon,  Judge)  ordering  forfeiture  in  connection  with  a  conviction  for,  inter  alia,  three  counts  of  mortgage fraud (Counts Seven, Eight, and Nine). We consider here  whether  the  District  Court  erred  by  ordering  forfeiture  on  Count  Seven under a statute which, while applicable to Count Seven, was  only charged in the indictment in connection with Counts Eight and  Nine an oversight that was not corrected by the Government or the  District Court before or during sentencing.     We  hold  that  this  was  error  inasmuch  as  the  uncharged  forfeiture statute resulted in harsher forfeiture with respect to Count  Seven than that sought in the indictment. Accordingly, we AFFIRM  the forfeiture order on Counts Eight and Nine only, and REMAND  the  cause  to  the  District  Court  with  instructions  to  VACATE  the  forfeiture order on Count Seven, and conduct such further forfeiture  proceedings as may be appropriate in the circumstances.1  1 In a summary order entered today in this case, we affirmed the convictions of  defendants Sandy Annabi and Zehy Jereis on all eleven counts charged against one or  4                             No. 12 4988 cv (L) BACKGROUND  On March 29, 2012, a jury convicted Annabi of, inter alia, three  counts  of  mortgage  fraud  in  violation  of  18  U.S.C.  §  1014  (Counts  Seven,  Eight,  and  Nine).  The  Government  sought  forfeiture  of  the  gross proceeds of the fraudulently obtained loans described in these  three counts.  The Superseding Indictment (the  Indictment ) sought, on all  three  counts,  forfeiture  to  the  United  States,  pursuant  to  the  civil  forfeiture  provision,  18  U.S.C.  §  981(a)(1)(C),2  and  28  U.S.C.  § 2461(c).3  On  Counts  Eight  and  Nine  only,  the  Indictment  sought  forfeiture  pursuant  to  the  criminal  forfeiture  provision,  18  U.S.C.  § 982(a)(2)(A).4  Significantly,  §  981(a)(2)(C)  of  the  civil  forfeiture  provision requires a deduction from forfeiture of any portion of the  both of them, and affirmed the District Court s order of forfeiture with respect to Counts  One through Six.    18 U.S.C. § 981(a)(1)(C) provides for forfeiture to the United States of  [a]ny  property, real or personal, which constitutes or is derived from proceeds traceable to a  violation of section [1014] of this title . . . .  In such cases, proceeds must include  a  deduction from the forfeiture to the extent that the loan was repaid . . . without any  financial loss to the victim.  Id. § 981(a)(2)(C).  2  28 U.S.C. § 2461(c) provides:  If a person is charged in a criminal case with a  violation of an Act of Congress for which the civil or criminal forfeiture of property is  authorized, the Government may include notice of the forfeiture in the indictment or  information pursuant to the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure.   3  18 U.S.C. § 982(a)(2)(A) provides, in relevant part:  The court, in imposing  sentence on a person convicted of a violation of . . .section [1014] of this title, affecting a  financial institution . . . shall order that the person forfeit to the United States any  property constituting, or derived from, proceeds the person obtained directly or indirectly, as the result of such violation. 4 5                             No. 12 4988 cv (L) fraudulent loan that was repaid at no loss to the victim, whereas the  criminal forfeiture provision, § 982(a)(2)(A), requires forfeiture of the  entire  amount  of  the  fraudulent  loan,  regardless  of  whether  it  was  repaid. United States v. Peters, 732 F.3d 93, 100 01 & n.2 (2d Cir. 2013).  At  sentencing,  the  District  Court  ordered  Annabi  to  forfeit  $1,060,800 in connection with the three mortgage fraud counts based  on  the  full  amount  of  the  loans  fraudulently  obtained,  without  regard to any portions of the loans that had been repaid: $480,700 for  the Patton Drive house (Count Seven); $522,500 for the Bacon Place  house  (Count  Eight);  and  $57,600  for  the  Rumsey  Road  apartment  (Count  Nine).  The  District  Court  did  not  specify  whether  it  was  ordering  forfeiture  under  the  civil  or  criminal  forfeiture  provision  for each of the various counts.   DISCUSSION  Annabi  argues  on  appeal  that  the  forfeiture  order  was  excessive  inasmuch  as  she  had  already  satisfied  her  obligations  in  their  entirety  for  the  Patton  Drive  house  (Count  Seven)  and  the  Rumsey  Road  apartment  (Count  Nine),  resulting  in  no  loss  to  the  banks,  and  inasmuch  as  the  anticipated  loss  to  the  banks  on  the  Bacon Place house (Count Eight) was only $164,460.68.   On  appeal  from  a  forfeiture  order,  we  review  the  district  court s  legal  conclusions  de  novo  and  its  factual  findings  for  clear  error. United States v. Treacy, 639 F.3d 32, 47 (2d Cir. 2011).       6                             No. 12 4988 cv (L) A. Counts Eight and Nine  We recently confirmed that § 982(a) of the criminal forfeiture  statute does not permit a defendant to offset loan proceeds that have  been  repaid.  See  Peters,  732  F.3d  at  102  (gross  receipts,  rather  than  profits, are the proper measure of criminal forfeiture); see also United  States v. Newman, 659 F.3d 1235, 1244 (9th Cir. 2011) ( For purposes  of criminal forfeiture, the  proceeds  of a fraudulently obtained loan  equal  the  amount  of  the  loan. ).  The  District  Court  did  not,  therefore,  err  by  ordering  forfeiture  of  the  full  amount  of  the  loans  fraudulently  obtained  in  connection  with  Counts  Eight  and  Nine,  totaling  $580,100,  without  regard  to  whether  Annabi  repaid  any  portion of those loans.    B. Count Seven  Although  §  982(a)(2)(A)  also  could  have  applied  to  Count  Seven, the Indictment sought forfeiture on this Count only pursuant  to  civil  forfeiture  provision  18  U.S.C.  § 981(a)(1)(C),  which  permits  a  deduction  from  the  forfeiture  to  the  extent  that  the  loan  was  repaid,  or  the  debt  was  satisfied,  without  any  financial  loss  to  the  victim.  Id. § 981(a)(2)(C).  Federal  Rule  of  Criminal  Procedure  32.2(a)  states:  A  court  must  not  enter  a  judgment  of  forfeiture  in  a  criminal  proceeding  unless  the  indictment  .  .  .  contains  notice  to  the  defendant  that  the  government  will  seek  the  forfeiture  of  property  as  part  of  any  sentence  in  accordance  with  the  applicable  statute.   (emphasis  supplied). Pursuant to this Rule, a criminal defendant has the right  7                             No. 12 4988 cv (L) to  know  not  only  that  forfeiture  is  being  sought,  but  also  the  statutory basis for forfeiture.   With  respect  to  Count  Seven,  the  Government  failed  to  state  the  criminal  forfeiture  provision  in  the  Indictment,  and  did  not  correct  this  oversight  prior  to  or  during  sentencing.  At  sentencing,  the  District  Court  did  not  specify  that  it  was  ordering  forfeiture  pursuant  to  the  criminal  forfeiture  provision,  but  it  nonetheless  required  Annabi  to  forfeit  the  full  amount  of  the  loan  fraudulently  obtained  on  the  Patton  Drive  house,  despite  the  fact  that  the  loan  had  been  repaid  in  full.  Such  forfeiture  is  permissible  only  under  § 982(a)(2)(A),  see  note  4  ante,  as  a  form  of  punishment,  separate  and  apart  from  any  restitutive  measures  imposed  during  sentencing,  Peters, 732 F.3d at 98.5   We  hold  that  where  the  Government  fails  to  invoke  an  applicable forfeiture provision in the indictment, and fails to correct  that  error  prior  to  entry  of  a  final  judgment,  forfeiture  must  be  limited  to  that  authorized  by  the  statute  cited  as  the  basis  for   The Government relies on United States v. Silvious, 512 F.3d 364 (7th Cir. 2008),  for the proposition that failure to state the correct forfeiture provision in an indictment is  harmless where the defendant has notice that forfeiture is sought. The circumstances of  that case are readily distinguishable. The defendant in Silvious had objected to a  preliminary forfeiture order that relied on statutes not listed in the indictment, where the  statute listed in the indictment was inapplicable to the circumstances presented. Id. at  369. Prior to the forfeiture hearing, the Government conceded that the statute charged  was inapplicable, but argued that forfeiture was still appropriate under a different  statute. Id. The Seventh Circuit affirmed the order of forfeiture, holding that the  defendant had adequate notice of the corrected forfeiture statute, and that the forfeiture  was not broadened in any way by the substitution of the proper statute.  Id. In the  instant case, by contrast, Annabi did not receive notice until appellate proceedings that  the Government intended to rely upon the harsher criminal forfeiture provision.  5 8                             No. 12 4988 cv (L) forfeiture,  and  of  which  the  defendant  had  notice.6  Accordingly,  Annabi s forfeiture on Count Seven is limited to that authorized by  § 981(a)(1)(c),  which,  by  its  express  terms,  entitles  her  to  offset  the  amount of the loan on the Patton Drive house that she repaid at no  loss to the bank.   CONCLUSION  To summarize:  (1) Forfeiture is limited to that authorized by the statute  listed  in  the  indictment,  even  if  greater  forfeiture  would  have  been  authorized  by  a  different  statute,  where  the  Government  fails  to  invoke  the  harsher  forfeiture provision prior to or during sentencing.   (2) 28  U.S.C.  §  982(a)  authorizes  forfeiture  of  the  full  amount of the loans fraudulently obtained in Counts  Eight and Nine, without an offset for any portion of  the loan that has been repaid.   (3) 28 U.S.C. § 981(a)(1)(c), the only forfeiture provision  charged  on  Count  Seven,  permits  an  offset  for  that  portion  of  the  loan  that  was  repaid  with  no  loss  to  the victim.  Accordingly,  we  AFFIRM  the  forfeiture  order  on  Counts  Eight and Nine, and REMAND the cause to the District Court with  instructions  to  VACATE  the  forfeiture  order  on  Count  Seven,  and   We do not address whether, prior to entry of the final forfeiture order, the  Government could have substituted the criminal forfeiture provision as the basis for  forfeiture on Count Seven. Nor do we opine on the fact pattern set forth in Silvious, note 5  ante, where the scope of forfeiture under the substituted provision was no greater than  the provision mistakenly cited in the Indictment. Those are not the facts before us.   6 9                             No. 12 4988 cv (L) conduct  such  further  forfeiture  proceedings  as  may  be  appropriate  in the circumstances.7   In the interest of judicial economy, any appeal from a subsequent District Court  Order, on remand or otherwise, shall be assigned to this panel upon the filing of a letter  request with the Clerk of the Court of Appeals within 21 days of the entry of the District  Court Order being appealed.   7