2005 North Carolina Code - General Statutes § 106-403. (Effective until October 1, 2009) Disposition of dead domesticated animals.

§ 106‑403.  (Effective until October 1, 2009) Disposition of dead domesticated animals.

It is the duty of the owner of domesticated animals that die from any cause and the owner or operator of the premises upon which any domesticated animals die, to bury the animals to a depth of at least three feet beneath the surface of the ground within 24 hours after knowledge of the death of the domesticated animals, or to otherwise dispose of the domesticated animals in a manner approved by the State Veterinarian. It is a violation of this section to bury any dead domesticated animal closer than 300 feet to any flowing stream or public body of water. It is unlawful for any person to remove the carcasses of dead domesticated animals from the person's premises to the premises of any other person without the written permission of the person having charge of the other premises and without burying the carcasses as provided under this section. The governing body of each municipality shall designate some appropriate person whose duty it shall be to provide for the removal and disposal, according to the provisions of this section, of any dead domesticated animals located within the limits of the municipality when the owner of the animals cannot be determined. The board of commissioners of each county shall designate some appropriate person whose duty it shall be to provide for the removal and disposal under this section, of any dead domesticated animals located within the limits of the county, but without the limits of any municipality, when the owner of the animals cannot be determined. All costs incurred by a municipality or county in the removal of dead domesticated animals shall be recoverable from the owner of the animals upon admission of ownership or conviction. "Domesticated animal" as used in this section includes poultry. (1919, c. 36; C.S., s. 4488; 1927, c. 2; 1939, c. 360, s. 4; 1971, c. 567, ss. 1, 2; 2001‑12, s. 9; 2003‑6, s. 1; 2005‑21, s. 1.)

 

§ 106‑403.  (Effective October 1, 2009) Disposition of dead domesticated animals.

It shall be the duty of the owner or person in charge of any of his domesticated animals that die from any cause and the owner, lessee, or person in charge of any land upon which any domesticated animals die, to bury the same to a depth of at least three feet beneath the surface of the ground within 24 hours after knowledge of the death of said domesticated animals, or to otherwise dispose of the same in a manner approved by the State Veterinarian. It shall be a violation of this statute to bury any dead domesticated animal closer than 300 feet to any flowing stream or public body of water. It shall be unlawful for any person to remove the carcasses of dead domesticated animals from his premises to the premises of any other person without the written permission of the person having charge of such premises and without burying said carcasses as above provided. The governing body of each municipality shall designate some appropriate person whose duty it shall be to provide for the removal and disposal, according to the provisions of this section, of any dead domesticated animals located within the limits of the municipality when the owner or owners of said animals cannot be determined. The board of commissioners of each county shall designate some appropriate person whose duty it shall be to provide for the removal and disposal, according to the provisions of this section, of any dead domesticated animals located within the limits of the county, but without the limits of any municipality, when the owner or owners of said animals cannot be determined. All costs incurred by a municipality or county in the removal of a dead domesticated animal shall be recoverable from the owner of such animal upon admission of ownership or conviction. "Domesticated animal" as used herein shall include poultry. (1919, c. 36; C.S., s. 4488; 1927, c. 2; 1939, c. 360, s. 4; 1971, c. 567, ss. 1, 2; 2001‑12, s. 9; 2003‑6, s. 1; 2005‑21, s. 1.)

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