2010 Georgia Code
TITLE 24 - EVIDENCE
CHAPTER 9 - WITNESSES GENERALLY
ARTICLE 4 - CREDIBILITY
§ 24-9-84.1 - How witness impeached -- Prior convictions

O.C.G.A. 24-9-84.1 (2010)
24-9-84.1. How witness impeached -- Prior convictions


(a) General rule. For the purpose of attacking the credibility of a witness, or of the defendant, if the defendant testifies:

(1) Evidence that a witness has been convicted of a crime shall be admitted if the crime was punishable by death or imprisonment of one year or more under the law under which the witness was convicted if the court determines that the probative value of admitting the evidence outweighs its prejudicial effect to the witness;

(2) Evidence that the defendant has been convicted of a crime shall be admitted if the crime was punishable by death or imprisonment of one year or more under the law under which the defendant was convicted if the court determines that the probative value of admitting the evidence substantially outweighs its prejudicial effect to the defendant; and

(3) Evidence that any witness or the defendant has been convicted of a crime shall be admitted if it involved dishonesty or making a false statement, regardless of the punishment that could be imposed for such offense.

(b) Time limit. Evidence of a conviction under subsection (a) of this Code section is not admissible if a period of more than ten years has elapsed since the date of the conviction or of the release of the witness or the defendant from the confinement imposed for that conviction, whichever is the later date, unless the court determines, in the interest of justice, that the probative value of the conviction supported by specific facts and circumstances substantially outweighs its prejudicial effect. However, evidence of a conviction more than ten years old, as calculated in this subsection, is not admissible unless the proponent gives to the adverse party sufficient advance written notice of intent to use such evidence to provide the adverse party with a fair opportunity to contest the use of such evidence.

(c) Effect of pardon or annulment. Evidence of a conviction is not admissible under this Code section if:

(1) The conviction has been the subject of a pardon or annulment based on a finding of the rehabilitation of the person convicted and such person has not been convicted of a subsequent crime that was punishable by death or imprisonment for one year or more; or

(2) The conviction has been the subject of a pardon, annulment, or other equivalent procedure based on a finding of innocence.

(d) Juvenile adjudications. An adjudication of delinquency in juvenile court shall be inadmissible against a defendant in a criminal case. An adjudication of delinquency in juvenile court shall be presumed to be inadmissible against a witness in a criminal case; however, this presumption may be rebutted only if it is shown that:

(1) The factual basis for the proven allegations of delinquency would have constituted a crime under the laws of the state of the juvenile court if committed by an adult at the time they were committed by the juvenile:

(2) The probative value of the evidence substantially outweighs the prejudicial effect of its admission; and

(3) The court finds that admission of the adjudication into evidence is necessary for a fair determination of the issue of guilt or innocence of the defendant.

(e) Pendency of appeal. The pendency of an appeal from a conviction does not render evidence of a conviction inadmissible. Evidence of the pendency of an appeal shall be admissible.
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